Author Topic: Editor Recruitment  (Read 728 times)

Offline bocchi!

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Editor Recruitment
« on: June 13, 2019, 10:04 pm »
Welcome to the current mainsite editor recruitment.

How to write your application:
For the beginning of your application, explain what you look for in featured games in a general sense, and what you think makes for a game that isn't necessarily bad but isn't quite feature-worthy (so don't just say a game that a brand new member put 10 fire trolls and then published).

Find one featured game (can be from any time) and one unfeatured game* that you believe is feature-worthy. Explain why you think the featured game received it's feature, and then why you believe the unfeatured game deserves a feature.

If the two games you chose are from the same creator, try to make comparisons between the unfeatured and featured game to make a case for why the unfeatured one deserves a feature, this part isn't required however.

There's no required length for your application, a shorter application isn't inherently worse and a longer one isn't inherently better, I just want you to say everything you need to explain your thought process.

*I'm aware that with the waning activity of games being made it may be more difficult to find unfeatured games that deserve a feature than it used to be, try your best to find one that you think deserves it but if you absolutely can't you can substitute the unfeatured game with a second featured game of a different creator than the first one you chose. This is only an alternative if it's impossible for you to find an unfeatured one though, don't start off with this route.



You can either post your application in this thread or PM it to me here or on discord (evil EK m&a#8265), whichever is most comfortable for you.

You'll be voted on by a group of recruiters and when we've reached a conclusion I'll tell you whether you pass or not.

If you fail voting you can try again with a new application whenever you want, I'm not setting a waiting period, but I would recommend giving yourself time to work on a new application instead of jumping back into it immediately.

Since it's unknown when geoff will come online and update badges if you pass recruitment you can ask me to feature games for you and I'll do it with no questions asked until your badge is given.

Good luck! If you have any questions about the application process or need something clarified ask here or message me and I'll get to you asap



Passed:
Bricc
Ethan
« Last Edit: June 18, 2019, 10:00 pm by charismatic »
 

Offline seanthechinaman

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Re: Editor Recruitment
« Reply #1 on: June 14, 2019, 01:06 am »
Good application, I approve.

I don't remember whether you already recruited Editor Recruiters or not, but I'd be happy to help.
 

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Re: Editor Recruitment
« Reply #2 on: June 14, 2019, 06:22 am »
PLEASE PLEASE, I WOULD LIKE TO APPLY! MY DREAM TO BCOME EDITOR!

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Online Rockyroad797

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Re: Editor Recruitment
« Reply #3 on: June 14, 2019, 06:27 am »
I liked the old recruitment better where you just write two reviews and get decided based on how constructive it was, whereas here its a regaular app and voting takes place, making it tougher to become an editor. Nvm. Also, finding unfeatured games that deserve a feature is no sweat at all. I have gone past thousands of such games.

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Offline Bricc

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Re: Editor Recruitment
« Reply #4 on: June 15, 2019, 01:42 pm »
When I look for a featured game, I look for something that is well thought out and well executed. This means that it had at least some planning behind it and wasn't just thought up and created without any pre-production. I think this is a major part of game development - games have many elements to them, and without planning (which is hugely overlooked), you are certain to either miss one out or execute it poorly. I base a lot of my knowledge off what I've learnt from my Games Design course in college thus far, though of course with Sploder's dwindling activity and lack of new games, we can be a little more lenient on some of these qualities. I realise this is already beginning to be a bit much for my first paragraph, so to cut it short, a feature-worthy game should (generally) have: some form of story for the player to follow, good visuals, unique gameplay mechanics and features. Bonus points for a neat thumbnail or intriguing name.

There are many games out there that are good, but no better than good. These games are not at a feature-worthy standard, but are not bad. To explain my thought process here, I'll be referencing my game Visualize. There are some things that I was really proud of when creating this game, most notably the concept. You control an equalizer with the keyboard and hit the correctly coloured notes. It's pretty simple, but not done before, and therefore scores points for originality. Unfortunately, the game didn't end up being featured, and it's quite clear why when you look into it. It misses a lot of qualities mentioned above, and it's all down to the planning. Because I didn't think about the game beforehand, it had these negative qualities: being rushed (made in 2 hours) because I didn't want to forget my ideas instead of just writing them down and expanding upon them, a low-quality story (though this, in this instance, wouldn't affect it too much), lack of scenery/detail attempted to be excused by the fact that it was intended to be styled like an old arcade game and, while the gameplay itself wasn't bad, the difficulty was unbalanced. With all of these could-be-better aspects of the game put together, it was just an average game despite the otherwise neat concept.

For the featured game, I've chosen Dream by lordeldar. Quality Arcade games are very difficult to find on Sploder and always have been. With its limitations on placement and objects, it is indeed difficult to use this creator to craft a feature-worthy game. Despite this, lordeldar managed to do just that. Dream had me interested from the second I saw the thumbnail; it's uncommon to see an Arcade game with a black background in the thumbnail, and it seemed appropriate for the name of the game. Since I do know that lordeldar is a rather good game maker, I know this was intentional (even if it wasn't, though, it's good!), which already makes me positive that there was some planning involved in and before this game's creation. This is the sort of thing creators need to consider. Details like the thumbnail can already make the difference between your game being featured or staying unfeatured, because if it doesn't look interesting, why would anyone (including editors) play it?

The story in Dream is very detailed and even links into the gameplay and scenery. The scenery in just about every part reflects the mood of the story while also fitting with the area it's in. The story itself is an original piece and a very interesting plot, which is usually the best you get on Sploder. But lordeldar doesn't stop there. The gameplay in every area is essential to the story, and the further you get into the game, the more you understand past events. For example, at the beginning, you fall and are attacked. Later on, as the story develops, you realise that these are the events that have happened to Ronald Jacub in his early life. In Dream, the story influences literally everything else in the game, and it's executed as perfectly as it gets on Sploder. It's not hard to understand but also requires the player to think and link events together, which makes it feel more interactive and the player really feels involved and included in the game.

Another hugely impressive element in Dream is the gameplay. One thing that I really enjoy is how it switches between two worlds regularly, mixing everything up, including the gameplay elements (since there are some objects available only in certain worlds). None of the objects or sequences are overused, meaning every section feels like a new experience. Dream is a perfect example of how the Arcade creator should be used. As previously mentioned, the Arcade creator is generally quite limited. Lordeldar has worked around this very well and has made parts that would otherwise feel the same as any other Arcade game unique. One of my favourite examples of this is the block section in 1-4. Instead of a vine appearing to climb up, blocks from the background break to a level you can stand on and you are then required to bounce up off the Helmut. It's little things like this that create unique experiences, and it's clear that lordeldar knows that. It's also important to keep the difficulty fun and fair while providing the player with some challenge, and Dream does that well. Arcade games (including Dream) tend to be quite long, so challenge is necessary, but not enough to infuriate the player to the point where they choose to quit. To sum it up, this is probably the best gameplay I've seen in an Arcade game because of its originality and how it's actually meaningful to the story.

And the compliments don't stop there! Dream's scenery is crazy good. Some parts look very slightly messy, but that really doesn't take away from the feel it gives off. I find it really interesting (and fantastic!) that the story links with practically everything in this game, and the scenery is no exception. There is a point in the story at which Ronald basically becomes depressed and spends 12 years in a cave. The colours in said cave are relatively dark/dull, which conveys the mood of Ronald. In fact, I would go as far as saying the scenery is quite boring here. Lordeldar shows us that boring doesn't always mean bad, though. All of the decoration is placed within reason, whether it be to convey the mood or to make it clear what area we're in, and that definitely requires some skill to do.

Dream has everything it should have. It has a detailed story, original gameplay (with consistently fair difficulty), scenery which sets the mood while also being appropriate for the area it's located in and was most definitely planned before it was created. This probably has to be one of my favourite games and it for sure deserves its spot on the featured list.

For my second game choice, I've chosen another featured game since I was unable to find anything that wasn't featured. However, to try and mix it up a bit, I tried to find an older game to talk about and why I think it still lives up to today's standards. That game is Through the Steel and Rubble 2 by giratina8000. A lot of people aren't a fan of this game, but when you actually dive down deep into it, you have to appreciate how well everything was done 7 years ago. The thumbnail has brown background that's not too dark but light enough for you to see the (what appear to be floating) dark structures that appear to be a factory or an evil base. The thumbnail provides a sense of mystery which, in my eyes, is very appropriate here as the player begins the game with no knowledge of their surroundings and slowly being fed information throughout the levels. It would be extremely anticlimactic for us to figure everything out from the thumbnail to then be told the story in the game. I think it might actually be a snapshot of one of the later levels of the game. Whether or not this was intentional or because giratina8000 didn't think to create a custom thumbnail, it certainly works well in this scenario.

Standards for games might develop over time, but storylines are timeless; a story today could be as good as a story from 30 years ago. This is a case with Through the Steel and Rubble 2. Don't get me wrong - the storyline here is nowhere near on Dream's level, but it's still good. There is something about this type of story in comparison to Dream (though it isn't necessarily better) that I like, and that's that you can add your own little thoughts, details and ideas to it because it's vague but not too vague. Maybe the evil villain has an afro, wears green sunglasses and has pink slippers. While you don't get too much information, I wouldn't say you get too little, either. Similarly to Dream, the story develops as you go. The storyline in Through the Steel and Rubble 2 is nowhere near as impressive and immersive as Dream, but it's good enough to hold up a feature.

In general, I hate platforming PPGs. That's just me personally, however, this one controls much better than most and is probably the most enjoyable PPG platformer for me. It felt much more responsive and I felt like I was in control, the way the player should feel. The player being a circle shape definitely helps and reduces the amount of times you get stuck, for example on ledges. Lots of games fail to mix the story and gameplay well, but Through the Steel and Rubble 2 doesn't. In this game, giratina8000 makes sure each obstacle makes sense in the location of the game (an enemy base). We expect to see things such as lava and various traps in an enemy base, and that's what we get. It certainly isn't the most original, but it fits well, and I think that matters more than originality (or we'd have another Visualize situation). Again, Dream is the superior game here by far, but the gameplay is good enough to maintain the feature it has. I liked the timing elements mixed in with the platforming gameplay. Together, they just worked. Having to time your jumps rather than just jumping around willy nilly adds to the stress and overall feel. If you woke up in a secret base in real life, how would you feel? Probably tense, anxious and not knowing whether you're going to make it. This is the feeling you get from Through the Steel and Rubble 2. The difficulty is pretty much spot on, too, becoming more difficult the further you get. It's pretty standard to do this, so I don't have much to say except that this box is checked!

In my opinion, for the time this game was made, it looks great! You get the right vibe from it and you really do feel like you're in some sort of base or factory setting. You may know that I'm a fan of the default PPG textures - when used correctly they can look great, and giratina8000 did not fail to impress. There are plenty of structures to be seen, collidable and non-collidable and I'm confident in saying all of them are well placed and fill up the perfect amount of space. An essential part to a game is being able to tell what is safe and what isn't and you probably already guessed that is no issue here. Giratina8000 uses default textures such as skulls to signify that an object is deadly and the player doesn't have to sit there questioning it. Through the Steel and Rubble 2 sticks to using the default textures as opposed to mixing them with graphics, which I would say only looks good if done very well, and I think giratina8000 has made a good decision to keep things fluent here. Another thing I absolutely love about this game compared to many others is how alive the environment feels; there aren't just static spikes but also crushers, spilling acid, etc. What I'm say is that it doesn't feel static unlike some other games. Dream has a natural advantage here because it has a lot of things animated by default, unlike the PPG, so I think giratina8000 has used what they've got well.

Overall, this game holds up its feature well 7 years on from its original creation. For sure this game doesn't have as much planning as Dream did, but I am pretty confident in saying it had some. Remember, though, Dream and Through the Steel and Rubble 2 are entirely different games in different creators, which both have pros and cons in certain areas. All in all, both of these games firmly hold up their feature.


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Offline laughingcowking1

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Re: Editor Recruitment
« Reply #5 on: June 15, 2019, 04:10 pm »
When I look for a featured game, I look for something that is well thought out and well executed. This means that it had at least some planning behind it and wasn't just thought up and created without any pre-production. I think this is a major part of game development - games have many elements to them, and without planning (which is hugely overlooked), you are certain to either miss one out or execute it poorly. I base a lot of my knowledge off what I've learnt from my Games Design course in college thus far, though of course with Sploder's dwindling activity and lack of new games, we can be a little more lenient on some of these qualities. I realise this is already beginning to be a bit much for my first paragraph, so to cut it short, a feature-worthy game should (generally) have: some form of story for the player to follow, good visuals, unique gameplay mechanics and features. Bonus points for a neat thumbnail or intriguing name.

There are many games out there that are good, but no better than good. These games are not at a feature-worthy standard, but are not bad. To explain my thought process here, I'll be referencing my game Visualize. There are some things that I was really proud of when creating this game, most notably the concept. You control an equalizer with the keyboard and hit the correctly coloured notes. It's pretty simple, but not done before, and therefore scores points for originality. Unfortunately, the game didn't end up being featured, and it's quite clear why when you look into it. It misses a lot of qualities mentioned above, and it's all down to the planning. Because I didn't think about the game beforehand, it had these negative qualities: being rushed (made in 2 hours) because I didn't want to forget my ideas instead of just writing them down and expanding upon them, a low-quality story (though this, in this instance, wouldn't affect it too much), lack of scenery/detail attempted to be excused by the fact that it was intended to be styled like an old arcade game and, while the gameplay itself wasn't bad, the difficulty was unbalanced. With all of these could-be-better aspects of the game put together, it was just an average game despite the otherwise neat concept.

For the featured game, I've chosen Dream by lordeldar. Quality Arcade games are very difficult to find on Sploder and always have been. With its limitations on placement and objects, it is indeed difficult to use this creator to craft a feature-worthy game. Despite this, lordeldar managed to do just that. Dream had me interested from the second I saw the thumbnail; it's uncommon to see an Arcade game with a black background in the thumbnail, and it seemed appropriate for the name of the game. Since I do know that lordeldar is a rather good game maker, I know this was intentional (even if it wasn't, though, it's good!), which already makes me positive that there was some planning involved in and before this game's creation. This is the sort of thing creators need to consider. Details like the thumbnail can already make the difference between your game being featured or staying unfeatured, because if it doesn't look interesting, why would anyone (including editors) play it?

The story in Dream is very detailed and even links into the gameplay and scenery. The scenery in just about every part reflects the mood of the story while also fitting with the area it's in. The story itself is an original piece and a very interesting plot, which is usually the best you get on Sploder. But lordeldar doesn't stop there. The gameplay in every area is essential to the story, and the further you get into the game, the more you understand past events. For example, at the beginning, you fall and are attacked. Later on, as the story develops, you realise that these are the events that have happened to Ronald Jacub in his early life. In Dream, the story influences literally everything else in the game, and it's executed as perfectly as it gets on Sploder. It's not hard to understand but also requires the player to think and link events together, which makes it feel more interactive and the player really feels involved and included in the game.

Another hugely impressive element in Dream is the gameplay. One thing that I really enjoy is how it switches between two worlds regularly, mixing everything up, including the gameplay elements (since there are some objects available only in certain worlds). None of the objects or sequences are overused, meaning every section feels like a new experience. Dream is a perfect example of how the Arcade creator should be used. As previously mentioned, the Arcade creator is generally quite limited. Lordeldar has worked around this very well and has made parts that would otherwise feel the same as any other Arcade game unique. One of my favourite examples of this is the block section in 1-4. Instead of a vine appearing to climb up, blocks from the background break to a level you can stand on and you are then required to bounce up off the Helmut. It's little things like this that create unique experiences, and it's clear that lordeldar knows that. It's also important to keep the difficulty fun and fair while providing the player with some challenge, and Dream does that well. Arcade games (including Dream) tend to be quite long, so challenge is necessary, but not enough to infuriate the player to the point where they choose to quit. To sum it up, this is probably the best gameplay I've seen in an Arcade game because of its originality and how it's actually meaningful to the story.

And the compliments don't stop there! Dream's scenery is crazy good. Some parts look very slightly messy, but that really doesn't take away from the feel it gives off. I find it really interesting (and fantastic!) that the story links with practically everything in this game, and the scenery is no exception. There is a point in the story at which Ronald basically becomes depressed and spends 12 years in a cave. The colours in said cave are relatively dark/dull, which conveys the mood of Ronald. In fact, I would go as far as saying the scenery is quite boring here. Lordeldar shows us that boring doesn't always mean bad, though. All of the decoration is placed within reason, whether it be to convey the mood or to make it clear what area we're in, and that definitely requires some skill to do.

Dream has everything it should have. It has a detailed story, original gameplay (with consistently fair difficulty), scenery which sets the mood while also being appropriate for the area it's located in and was most definitely planned before it was created. This probably has to be one of my favourite games and it for sure deserves its spot on the featured list.

For my second game choice, I've chosen another featured game since I was unable to find anything that wasn't featured. However, to try and mix it up a bit, I tried to find an older game to talk about and why I think it still lives up to today's standards. That game is Through the Steel and Rubble 2 by giratina8000. A lot of people aren't a fan of this game, but when you actually dive down deep into it, you have to appreciate how well everything was done 7 years ago. The thumbnail has brown background that's not too dark but light enough for you to see the (what appear to be floating) dark structures that appear to be a factory or an evil base. The thumbnail provides a sense of mystery which, in my eyes, is very appropriate here as the player begins the game with no knowledge of their surroundings and slowly being fed information throughout the levels. It would be extremely anticlimactic for us to figure everything out from the thumbnail to then be told the story in the game. I think it might actually be a snapshot of one of the later levels of the game. Whether or not this was intentional or because giratina8000 didn't think to create a custom thumbnail, it certainly works well in this scenario.

Standards for games might develop over time, but storylines are timeless; a story today could be as good as a story from 30 years ago. This is a case with Through the Steel and Rubble 2. Don't get me wrong - the storyline here is nowhere near on Dream's level, but it's still good. There is something about this type of story in comparison to Dream (though it isn't necessarily better) that I like, and that's that you can add your own little thoughts, details and ideas to it because it's vague but not too vague. Maybe the evil villain has an afro, wears green sunglasses and has pink slippers. While you don't get too much information, I wouldn't say you get too little, either. Similarly to Dream, the story develops as you go. The storyline in Through the Steel and Rubble 2 is nowhere near as impressive and immersive as Dream, but it's good enough to hold up a feature.

In general, I hate platforming PPGs. That's just me personally, however, this one controls much better than most and is probably the most enjoyable PPG platformer for me. It felt much more responsive and I felt like I was in control, the way the player should feel. The player being a circle shape definitely helps and reduces the amount of times you get stuck, for example on ledges. Lots of games fail to mix the story and gameplay well, but Through the Steel and Rubble 2 doesn't. In this game, giratina8000 makes sure each obstacle makes sense in the location of the game (an enemy base). We expect to see things such as lava and various traps in an enemy base, and that's what we get. It certainly isn't the most original, but it fits well, and I think that matters more than originality (or we'd have another Visualize situation). Again, Dream is the superior game here by far, but the gameplay is good enough to maintain the feature it has. I liked the timing elements mixed in with the platforming gameplay. Together, they just worked. Having to time your jumps rather than just jumping around willy nilly adds to the stress and overall feel. If you woke up in a secret base in real life, how would you feel? Probably tense, anxious and not knowing whether you're going to make it. This is the feeling you get from Through the Steel and Rubble 2. The difficulty is pretty much spot on, too, becoming more difficult the further you get. It's pretty standard to do this, so I don't have much to say except that this box is checked!

In my opinion, for the time this game was made, it looks great! You get the right vibe from it and you really do feel like you're in some sort of base or factory setting. You may know that I'm a fan of the default PPG textures - when used correctly they can look great, and giratina8000 did not fail to impress. There are plenty of structures to be seen, collidable and non-collidable and I'm confident in saying all of them are well placed and fill up the perfect amount of space. An essential part to a game is being able to tell what is safe and what isn't and you probably already guessed that is no issue here. Giratina8000 uses default textures such as skulls to signify that an object is deadly and the player doesn't have to sit there questioning it. Through the Steel and Rubble 2 sticks to using the default textures as opposed to mixing them with graphics, which I would say only looks good if done very well, and I think giratina8000 has made a good decision to keep things fluent here. Another thing I absolutely love about this game compared to many others is how alive the environment feels; there aren't just static spikes but also crushers, spilling acid, etc. What I'm say is that it doesn't feel static unlike some other games. Dream has a natural advantage here because it has a lot of things animated by default, unlike the PPG, so I think giratina8000 has used what they've got well.

Overall, this game holds up its feature well 7 years on from its original creation. For sure this game doesn't have as much planning as Dream did, but I am pretty confident in saying it had some. Remember, though, Dream and Through the Steel and Rubble 2 are entirely different games in different creators, which both have pros and cons in certain areas. All in all, both of these games firmly hold up their feature.
:o :o  :o wow u wrote a lot
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Offline Bricc

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Re: Editor Recruitment
« Reply #6 on: June 15, 2019, 04:14 pm »
:o :o  :o wow u wrote a lot

Honestly, it isn't that much. It's probably around the length of your average reviewer application, because it's essentially two mini reviewer applications in one plus a little extra at the beginning. :P


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Re: Editor Recruitment
« Reply #7 on: June 15, 2019, 04:23 pm »
Honestly, it isn't that much. It's probably around the length of your average reviewer application, because it's essentially two mini reviewer applications in one plus a little extra at the beginning. :P
Fine for me maybe
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Re: Editor Recruitment
« Reply #8 on: June 16, 2019, 12:28 am »
When I look for a featured game, I look for something that is well thought out and well executed. This means that it had at least some planning behind it and wasn't just thought up and created without any pre-production. I think this is a major part of game development - games have many elements to them, and without planning (which is hugely overlooked), you are certain to either miss one out or execute it poorly. I base a lot of my knowledge off what I've learnt from my Games Design course in college thus far, though of course with Sploder's dwindling activity and lack of new games, we can be a little more lenient on some of these qualities. I realise this is already beginning to be a bit much for my first paragraph, so to cut it short, a feature-worthy game should (generally) have: some form of story for the player to follow, good visuals, unique gameplay mechanics and features. Bonus points for a neat thumbnail or intriguing name.

There are many games out there that are good, but no better than good. These games are not at a feature-worthy standard, but are not bad. To explain my thought process here, I'll be referencing my game Visualize. There are some things that I was really proud of when creating this game, most notably the concept. You control an equalizer with the keyboard and hit the correctly coloured notes. It's pretty simple, but not done before, and therefore scores points for originality. Unfortunately, the game didn't end up being featured, and it's quite clear why when you look into it. It misses a lot of qualities mentioned above, and it's all down to the planning. Because I didn't think about the game beforehand, it had these negative qualities: being rushed (made in 2 hours) because I didn't want to forget my ideas instead of just writing them down and expanding upon them, a low-quality story (though this, in this instance, wouldn't affect it too much), lack of scenery/detail attempted to be excused by the fact that it was intended to be styled like an old arcade game and, while the gameplay itself wasn't bad, the difficulty was unbalanced. With all of these could-be-better aspects of the game put together, it was just an average game despite the otherwise neat concept.

For the featured game, I've chosen Dream by lordeldar. Quality Arcade games are very difficult to find on Sploder and always have been. With its limitations on placement and objects, it is indeed difficult to use this creator to craft a feature-worthy game. Despite this, lordeldar managed to do just that. Dream had me interested from the second I saw the thumbnail; it's uncommon to see an Arcade game with a black background in the thumbnail, and it seemed appropriate for the name of the game. Since I do know that lordeldar is a rather good game maker, I know this was intentional (even if it wasn't, though, it's good!), which already makes me positive that there was some planning involved in and before this game's creation. This is the sort of thing creators need to consider. Details like the thumbnail can already make the difference between your game being featured or staying unfeatured, because if it doesn't look interesting, why would anyone (including editors) play it?

The story in Dream is very detailed and even links into the gameplay and scenery. The scenery in just about every part reflects the mood of the story while also fitting with the area it's in. The story itself is an original piece and a very interesting plot, which is usually the best you get on Sploder. But lordeldar doesn't stop there. The gameplay in every area is essential to the story, and the further you get into the game, the more you understand past events. For example, at the beginning, you fall and are attacked. Later on, as the story develops, you realise that these are the events that have happened to Ronald Jacub in his early life. In Dream, the story influences literally everything else in the game, and it's executed as perfectly as it gets on Sploder. It's not hard to understand but also requires the player to think and link events together, which makes it feel more interactive and the player really feels involved and included in the game.

Another hugely impressive element in Dream is the gameplay. One thing that I really enjoy is how it switches between two worlds regularly, mixing everything up, including the gameplay elements (since there are some objects available only in certain worlds). None of the objects or sequences are overused, meaning every section feels like a new experience. Dream is a perfect example of how the Arcade creator should be used. As previously mentioned, the Arcade creator is generally quite limited. Lordeldar has worked around this very well and has made parts that would otherwise feel the same as any other Arcade game unique. One of my favourite examples of this is the block section in 1-4. Instead of a vine appearing to climb up, blocks from the background break to a level you can stand on and you are then required to bounce up off the Helmut. It's little things like this that create unique experiences, and it's clear that lordeldar knows that. It's also important to keep the difficulty fun and fair while providing the player with some challenge, and Dream does that well. Arcade games (including Dream) tend to be quite long, so challenge is necessary, but not enough to infuriate the player to the point where they choose to quit. To sum it up, this is probably the best gameplay I've seen in an Arcade game because of its originality and how it's actually meaningful to the story.

And the compliments don't stop there! Dream's scenery is crazy good. Some parts look very slightly messy, but that really doesn't take away from the feel it gives off. I find it really interesting (and fantastic!) that the story links with practically everything in this game, and the scenery is no exception. There is a point in the story at which Ronald basically becomes depressed and spends 12 years in a cave. The colours in said cave are relatively dark/dull, which conveys the mood of Ronald. In fact, I would go as far as saying the scenery is quite boring here. Lordeldar shows us that boring doesn't always mean bad, though. All of the decoration is placed within reason, whether it be to convey the mood or to make it clear what area we're in, and that definitely requires some skill to do.

Dream has everything it should have. It has a detailed story, original gameplay (with consistently fair difficulty), scenery which sets the mood while also being appropriate for the area it's located in and was most definitely planned before it was created. This probably has to be one of my favourite games and it for sure deserves its spot on the featured list.

For my second game choice, I've chosen another featured game since I was unable to find anything that wasn't featured. However, to try and mix it up a bit, I tried to find an older game to talk about and why I think it still lives up to today's standards. That game is Through the Steel and Rubble 2 by giratina8000. A lot of people aren't a fan of this game, but when you actually dive down deep into it, you have to appreciate how well everything was done 7 years ago. The thumbnail has brown background that's not too dark but light enough for you to see the (what appear to be floating) dark structures that appear to be a factory or an evil base. The thumbnail provides a sense of mystery which, in my eyes, is very appropriate here as the player begins the game with no knowledge of their surroundings and slowly being fed information throughout the levels. It would be extremely anticlimactic for us to figure everything out from the thumbnail to then be told the story in the game. I think it might actually be a snapshot of one of the later levels of the game. Whether or not this was intentional or because giratina8000 didn't think to create a custom thumbnail, it certainly works well in this scenario.

Standards for games might develop over time, but storylines are timeless; a story today could be as good as a story from 30 years ago. This is a case with Through the Steel and Rubble 2. Don't get me wrong - the storyline here is nowhere near on Dream's level, but it's still good. There is something about this type of story in comparison to Dream (though it isn't necessarily better) that I like, and that's that you can add your own little thoughts, details and ideas to it because it's vague but not too vague. Maybe the evil villain has an afro, wears green sunglasses and has pink slippers. While you don't get too much information, I wouldn't say you get too little, either. Similarly to Dream, the story develops as you go. The storyline in Through the Steel and Rubble 2 is nowhere near as impressive and immersive as Dream, but it's good enough to hold up a feature.

In general, I hate platforming PPGs. That's just me personally, however, this one controls much better than most and is probably the most enjoyable PPG platformer for me. It felt much more responsive and I felt like I was in control, the way the player should feel. The player being a circle shape definitely helps and reduces the amount of times you get stuck, for example on ledges. Lots of games fail to mix the story and gameplay well, but Through the Steel and Rubble 2 doesn't. In this game, giratina8000 makes sure each obstacle makes sense in the location of the game (an enemy base). We expect to see things such as lava and various traps in an enemy base, and that's what we get. It certainly isn't the most original, but it fits well, and I think that matters more than originality (or we'd have another Visualize situation). Again, Dream is the superior game here by far, but the gameplay is good enough to maintain the feature it has. I liked the timing elements mixed in with the platforming gameplay. Together, they just worked. Having to time your jumps rather than just jumping around willy nilly adds to the stress and overall feel. If you woke up in a secret base in real life, how would you feel? Probably tense, anxious and not knowing whether you're going to make it. This is the feeling you get from Through the Steel and Rubble 2. The difficulty is pretty much spot on, too, becoming more difficult the further you get. It's pretty standard to do this, so I don't have much to say except that this box is checked!

In my opinion, for the time this game was made, it looks great! You get the right vibe from it and you really do feel like you're in some sort of base or factory setting. You may know that I'm a fan of the default PPG textures - when used correctly they can look great, and giratina8000 did not fail to impress. There are plenty of structures to be seen, collidable and non-collidable and I'm confident in saying all of them are well placed and fill up the perfect amount of space. An essential part to a game is being able to tell what is safe and what isn't and you probably already guessed that is no issue here. Giratina8000 uses default textures such as skulls to signify that an object is deadly and the player doesn't have to sit there questioning it. Through the Steel and Rubble 2 sticks to using the default textures as opposed to mixing them with graphics, which I would say only looks good if done very well, and I think giratina8000 has made a good decision to keep things fluent here. Another thing I absolutely love about this game compared to many others is how alive the environment feels; there aren't just static spikes but also crushers, spilling acid, etc. What I'm say is that it doesn't feel static unlike some other games. Dream has a natural advantage here because it has a lot of things animated by default, unlike the PPG, so I think giratina8000 has used what they've got well.

Overall, this game holds up its feature well 7 years on from its original creation. For sure this game doesn't have as much planning as Dream did, but I am pretty confident in saying it had some. Remember, though, Dream and Through the Steel and Rubble 2 are entirely different games in different creators, which both have pros and cons in certain areas. All in all, both of these games firmly hold up their feature.

Cool App. You'll be a good editor.

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Re: Editor Recruitment
« Reply #9 on: June 16, 2019, 12:32 am »
When we had to explain how the featured and unfeatured game deserved features, we are just making a review of the game. So why can't I make a review in the MS?

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Re: Editor Recruitment
« Reply #10 on: June 16, 2019, 01:19 am »
Cool App. You'll be a good editor.

Thanks, I hope so! :)


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Re: Editor Recruitment
« Reply #11 on: June 16, 2019, 04:17 am »
Thanks, I hope so! :)

Good to have a new MRE

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Re: Editor Recruitment
« Reply #12 on: June 16, 2019, 07:13 am »
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Re: Editor Recruitment
« Reply #13 on: June 16, 2019, 07:45 am »


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Offline seanthechinaman

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Re: Editor Recruitment
« Reply #14 on: June 16, 2019, 07:47 am »
When we had to explain how the featured and unfeatured game deserved features, we are just making a review of the game. So why can't I make a review in the MS?
Read the body of the thread Rock, this is a new system. Reviews are no longer necessary, and I like that change.
 

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Re: Editor Recruitment
« Reply #15 on: June 16, 2019, 08:46 am »
Read the body of the thread Rock, this is a new system. Reviews are no longer necessary, and I like that change.

What I said is - Explaining about the game is the same as reviewing, so why can't we do either of them? It is the same as reviewing the game except done within the post.

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Re: Editor Recruitment
« Reply #16 on: June 16, 2019, 09:23 am »
Konni said I was allowed when I asked.
well, i said that you could talk about a game that youve reviewed in the past but i didnt mean copy/pasting the review and changing the wording in certain parts. i guess thats my fault for not specifying enough so w/e

What I said is - Explaining about the game is the same as reviewing, so why can't we do either of them? It is the same as reviewing the game except done within the post.
what im asking you to do in this application isnt quite the same as reviewing. reviewing usually involves talking about every aspect of the game, good and bad. for the application i just want you to explain the parts that you think are feature worthy and why they're feature worthy.

if what you end up writing could work as a review though then you can publish it as a mainsite review if you want to
 

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Re: Editor Recruitment
« Reply #17 on: June 16, 2019, 09:26 am »
well, i said that you could talk about a game that youve reviewed in the past but i didnt mean copy/pasting the review and changing the wording in certain parts. i guess thats my fault for not specifying enough so w/e

My bad. If I don’t pass this time I’ll make sure not to do that next time.


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Re: Editor Recruitment
« Reply #18 on: June 16, 2019, 09:26 am »
Since I failed my MOD app I am gonna do this app very soon

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Re: Editor Recruitment
« Reply #19 on: June 16, 2019, 02:02 pm »
Editor recruitment; Main site Username - Ethan2009

There are multiple things I look for in a featured game. One of the most important, I would say, is that the game contains captivating gameplay to link with the length of the game. For example, a long RPG game should have enough gameplay to keep the player motivated and entertained, but also keep the RPG style and the in-depth storyline that the game is built upon. A game should not majorly warp its style or genre to implement contrived gameplay, but instead should go with the flow and include the gameplay as it fits in.
Another thing that a sploder game should include is scenery that fits well with the theme and mixes well with its colors that are primarily used along with it. For example, if the theme of the game is dark and dire, the game maker should not use bright yellow and purple tiles - although they are complementary - and turn light effects off, but instead should include dark tunnels and creepy music. There could be a few exceptions to this depending on the specific game, however.
Difficulty in games is an important topic, since balancing the difficulty in games can be tricky for many people. However, I would say that it is important that a game is possible, and not too unforgiving, by which I mean that if you’re almost done with a thirty-minute game, it should not throw a nearly-impossible-to-pass trap that makes you redo the game. It is necessary for a game not to be impossible to lose, or close to it, and have no interactivity either.  A featured game should have good ideas and good execution along with it.

A game that is good, but not features worthy probably has a few flaws that hold it back such as an unbalanced difficulty, an area that is not possible to pass, an unforgiving trap, or just lacks gameplay or scenery. There are quite a few games out there that contain viable gameplay but are very messy in scenery and placement that makes it feel very rushed and full of flaws.
Any feature worthy game must have interactivity, and enough so that the player can have the patience to play through the game without reaching the point of tediousness. It is always helpful when boosting a good game up to the feature worthy level that you incorporate your own twist on already-used ideas, or innovate your own unique ideas.

One feature-worthy game that has already been featured is “Kill Creatingames” By Mat7772Lordeldar. This game has a unique style that combines classical puzzle elements with a modern game making style. One of the games that some concepts are pulled from is Generic by Matty and Epico, but Kill CG takes these concepts and brings them to a totally different level. This game is the embodiment of the pinnacle for robot puzzles and revolutionizes them as not just the average elevator puzzle, but also forces the player to use the rings to drag the robot along. As I stated before, taking a twist on an existing game’s idea is always helpful to boost your own. Kill CG - as I will be referring to it for the remaining duration of the application - uses cunning puzzles with archies, and takes the classic tedious switch hunting and combines it with a component of “Paint it Black” and adds an elevator in the water. I believed this was featured for quite a few reasons. Firstly, it was extraordinarily creative and looked great aesthetically. Many games that are being made focus on one aspect of game-making such as gameplay over the scenery, or graphics over puzzles, for example, but I think Kill CG balanced every aspect of the game-making process while still relying on gameplay and puzzles to keep the player entertained. Kill CG was also able to make typically boring or tedious puzzles and turn them into something any player - from casual to pro - can enjoy.  The game’s forgiving nature and balanced difficulty are only a few of the factors that add to this game. Therefore, Kill Creatingames was a fun and feature-worthy game, that was balanced and well thought out in very many ways.

One game that is not featured, but is nothing short of feature-worthy is Marauder by Rooney10. This game includes fantastic wheel sequences, high-paced, intense action. Marauder has a good amount of health, traps that are decently forgiving, and takes into account any player’s skill levels that they may have. This is essential to a game like this which has traps and lava at every corner. Marauder combines classic platformer elements and adds a unique type of scenery, and extra enemies and traps. With this style of game, it is very reminiscent of Rooney’s old game Classic, in the sense of traps, and cool, innovative sequences.  Marauder takes advantage of underrated objects lava and uses it in a new and creative way. Turrets, spikes, and other hazards were used in traps, and to slowly pare down the player's health over the duration of the game. This forces the player to think outside of the box and find new ways to take as little damage as they possibly can while still going on sidequests for health and powerups to benefit them in the long run. This concept is used way less than it should be used, mostly because it can be tedious, and hard to pin down in a game, but Rooney did a fantastic job of using the concept of chipping health just as it should be used. I would say Marauder easily surpasses a lot of the recently featured games because of its smooth flow and nice design.

Overall, both Kill Creatingames and Marauder are amazing games that are both feature- worthy, and in the place of an editor, I would feature both.
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Offline seanthechinaman

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Re: Editor Recruitment
« Reply #20 on: June 16, 2019, 03:08 pm »
Your application is worded strangely Ethan, difficult to understand.
 

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Re: Editor Recruitment
« Reply #21 on: June 16, 2019, 09:22 pm »
Your application is worded strangely Ethan, difficult to understand.
Probably
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Re: Editor Recruitment
« Reply #22 on: June 16, 2019, 11:27 pm »
Is there an application for recruiters or anything like that?
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Re: Editor Recruitment
« Reply #23 on: June 17, 2019, 06:53 am »
Is there an application for recruiters or anything like that?

That isn't told at the moment.

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Offline Bricc

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Re: Editor Recruitment
« Reply #24 on: June 17, 2019, 07:24 am »
Is there an application for recruiters or anything like that?

I was going to wait for Konni to answer this, but since I know the answer to this, it's no (for the moment).


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Re: Editor Recruitment
« Reply #25 on: June 17, 2019, 03:40 pm »
Bricc has passed

Is there an application for recruiters or anything like that?
maybe if we need any in the future but not atm
 

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Re: Editor Recruitment
« Reply #26 on: June 17, 2019, 10:59 pm »
Bricc has passed
maybe if we need any in the future but not atm
Oh.  So, did you already contact editors you wanted to be recruiters or something like that?
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Offline seanthechinaman

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Re: Editor Recruitment
« Reply #27 on: June 18, 2019, 01:42 am »
Why are the Recruiters being kept a secret? You think we're gonna bribe them to vote Yes for us?
 

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Re: Editor Recruitment
« Reply #28 on: June 18, 2019, 09:21 am »
Why are the Recruiters being kept a secret? You think we're gonna bribe them to vote Yes for us?
Yeah it's not right. Why not say it.
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Re: Editor Recruitment
« Reply #29 on: June 18, 2019, 10:46 am »
Cian, Lord, Wiktor and Konni are the four Recruiters. Not sure why that wasn't mentioned in the thread though, or why there was no formal application process for Recruiters. I understand why you'd want a smaller team size, but I would like to have been at least considered.